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Old 03-10-2012, 09:19 PM
KA1J KA1J is offline
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XJ11 rear tire replacement

I'm at the point where I need to replace the rear tire; it's too old, kinda worn and there's a piece of embedded glass in the center that looks pretty deep.

I know on my XJ650 maxim it was a close shave getting a proper tire situated as the dimensions were tight, within 3/4" of hitting an obstruction. I probably should replace the front tire as well but the rear is the one that's getting my attention at the moment. Problem with this rear for the XJ11 is finding a proper tire size that is the maximum that fits in there without issues.

I'm open to suggestions as to what I should put on it. I'm not into racing but I am into handling (my safety is #1 in my book). I don't want a tire that has the best handling but short life, I'd like to get some decent mileage out of it. And I need to keep the costs down as low as possible.

That's one question, the other is whether I should try to remove the tire from the rim myself. There's a somewhat local shop that will remove the tire & balance at a modest charge if I bring the wheel & the new tire to them but... I've been considering the Dyna Beads to auto-balance which can be reused from tire to tire. If I do it myself, there's no future charge I'll have to deal with from this point on.

Decisions, decisions... But suggestions as to a good cost effective excellent replacement is the first interest.

How to remove the tire safely without rim damage is the 2nd.

Idears?
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  #2  
Old 03-10-2012, 10:10 PM
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fredintoon fredintoon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KA1J View Post
I'm at the point where I need to replace the rear tire; it's too old, kinda worn and there's a piece of embedded glass in the center that looks pretty deep.

I know on my XJ650 maxim it was a close shave getting a proper tire situated as the dimensions were tight, within 3/4" of hitting an obstruction. I probably should replace the front tire as well but the rear is the one that's getting my attention at the moment. Problem with this rear for the XJ11 is finding a proper tire size that is the maximum that fits in there without issues.

I'm open to suggestions as to what I should put on it. I'm not into racing but I am into handling (my safety is #1 in my book). I don't want a tire that has the best handling but short life, I'd like to get some decent mileage out of it. And I need to keep the costs down as low as possible.

That's one question, the other is whether I should try to remove the tire from the rim myself. There's a somewhat local shop that will remove the tire & balance at a modest charge if I bring the wheel & the new tire to them but... I've been considering the Dyna Beads to auto-balance which can be reused from tire to tire. If I do it myself, there's no future charge I'll have to deal with from this point on.

Decisions, decisions... But suggestions as to a good cost effective excellent replacement is the first interest.

How to remove the tire safely without rim damage is the 2nd.

Idears?
Hi KA,
Oh boy! A tire and a dyna beads question in a single post.
Tires (replace the front one too, a new front is always a good thing)
Whatever tires you choose, take the wheels out and have the new tires professionally installed and balanced.
As to Dyna Beads, there's some as cry "miraculous invention" and there's some as scream "snake oil".
You choose.
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Old 03-10-2012, 10:20 PM
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TopCatGr58 TopCatGr58 is offline
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Oh Goody, another tire thread!

Yes, the swingarm limits the size you can put on there, the stock is 130/90-16 but depending on brand folks have been able to put a 140/90 in there without rubbing...provided it's black wall and not raised white lettering!

Mileage and handling/grip and Inexpensive are almost mutually exclusive.

I've been partial to Dunlop Elite series....now E3, but Tod has burned thru several over the past few years and reports reduced mileage duration with the more recent ones. Others will tell you about other brands, or will just suggest a quick search thru recent threads, plenty to read thru!

I've seen plastic covered motorcycle tire irons, but mine are just plain ones, but are wide and fairly smooth so they don't scratch or gouge the rim edges too badly. Some have reported good results with the balance beads, others just suggest doing your own static technique with wheel on axle and engine stands and stick on weights! YMMV!

T.C.
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Old 03-10-2012, 10:23 PM
crazy steve crazy steve is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KA1J View Post
...Problem with this rear for the XJ11 is finding a proper tire size that is the maximum that fits in there without issues.

I'm open to suggestions as to what I should put on it. I'm not into racing but I am into handling (my safety is #1 in my book). I don't want a tire that has the best handling but short life, I'd like to get some decent mileage out of it. And I need to keep the costs down as low as possible.

That's one question, the other is whether I should try to remove the tire from the rim myself. .

How to remove the tire safely without rim damage is the 2nd...
The rear size is simple.... 130/90-16. That's the stock replacement size, and it fits. You might be able to squeeze a 140/90-16 in, but there's enough variation in how deep the tire 'relief' in the swingarm is to make that a bit of a gamble; your choices in that size are also more limited.

You'll get a bunch of tire recommendations, but you can get front/rear Shinko 712s mail-order (usually including shipping) for about $110 for both. Try motorcyclesuperstore or JakeWilson for good prices.

DIY tire changes can resemble the proverbial monkey with a football, but a few tools like a set of irons and rim protectors will help (at least three of each); invite a friend over for that 'third hand' that always seems to be needed. You can get the tools when you buy the tires... http://www.jakewilson.com/t/56/-/396...nd-Accessories

This help?
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  #5  
Old 03-10-2012, 11:05 PM
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petejw petejw is offline
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fwiw, u dont need to ballance the rear tyre.
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  #6  
Old 03-11-2012, 05:41 AM
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WSL91 WSL91 is offline
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Mileage = hard compound poor traction, traction = soft compound and poor mileage. Tires are an exercise in compromise.

I just mounted a front tire myself. I bought the stuff to do it as I plan on doing it again and again. Unless you plan on doing this more than a couple times I suggest finding someone with the tools or just taking it to the dealer. If you want to save money pull the wheel and just carry that in.

If you do it all yourself you will save money on the tire and labor

Tire bead breaker 30.00, tire irons 20.00, dyna beads 30.00 rim gaurds 10.00, tire balancer (optional) 50.00. Got to mount a lot of tires to save money plus you have to dispose (properly) of the old tire.
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  #7  
Old 03-11-2012, 06:53 AM
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Lonerider62 Lonerider62 is offline
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First off, you probably won't be doing any track days I would imagine so you don't need $150 tires with three compound construction. I buy my tires from Jake Wilson because I haven't been able to beat their prices but I also check several parts houses to see what's available and what they are asking. Usually you'll get free shipping if you order a pair, vs a single tire. Shop and you will be thankful you did. If you feel OK doing your own tires have at it. It's really not that tough but having some tools for the job is a must (tire irons, protectors, and some lube to start). In many cases, your bike shop is going to charge you between $50 and $100 per tire for dismounting the old tire and puting the new one on. Although some people complain about the prices, I've also seen some wish they had paid someone after ruining a tire trying to get on. Some 50 or 55 series tires with very shallow relief wheels can be taxing. My FZ1 has such tires and wheels so I bought a Cycle Hill NO-MAR tire changer. It beats tire irons by a mile but it's also about $500 so for the casual owner it may not be worth the money. Finally, Dyna Beads do work because I have used them for at least three years and my FZ1 feels fine at an honest 140 MPH. Nuf said about that, but, you'll play hell re-using them because trying to pick up a million cermic balls the size of your pen's ball is just plain way too hard. Easier to spend another $3-$4.
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Old 03-11-2012, 08:33 AM
KA1J KA1J is offline
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On my 650 I have Dunlop D404 tires and they feel great on the road with good traction but I'm unhappy with how they have worn rapidly especially considering the price I paid for them. so that axiom "traction = soft compound and poor mileage" sure seems to be true. I chose that particular tire because it was on sale and was a brand known to me, I probably can do better price wise with a different brand and have the same handling.

I just don't know enough about the different brands & models to pick from. I won't be racing the bike and with the XJ11 getting low-mid 30's for MPG, I'm aware my Buick Century gets 32MPG on the interstate... With that I'd like to hopefully get better MPG with a different tire than it has on it now. Both tires need to be replaced as they are surely past the replacement date as I discovered when I bought it, nothing seems to have been replaced for many years prior. Steve mentioned Shinko tires, I don't know a thing about them but now I will read up on them. Rather than waste money on a gamble from a convincing ad, I'd rather go along with what's considered a good tire & deal from others that already have figured out what is a great choice & pick from that group. So hearing about models and brands you're happy with will help me choose.

I appreciate the suggestions about what to buy to change the tires (I'd never heard of "rim protectors...). When I was 20 I used to replace car tires at Sears but that was with a machine and I never manually replaced a tire except my bicycle tires in the 60's. OTOH, if I can replace rings on this XJ11 by myself, I can surely replace the tires myself so I'm not afraid to try once I know what to get & find out the steps do to do it right.
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82 XJ1100 Maxim "hurricane"- DEKA EXT18L AGM battery , NGK BPR6EIX spark plugs, Green Dyna coils, Sylvania SilverStar Ultra H4 bulb, 139 dB Stebel Nautilus air horn, Home-made K&N air filter based on an original paper filter frame, new piston rings, Barnett Clutch Springs, SS braid/Teflon brake lines, TKAT fork brace, rebuilt calipers, master cylinders, new brakes, reupholstered seat, lotsa little things and so many answered questions here.
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:23 AM
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jetmechmarty jetmechmarty is offline
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I'll throw mine out there too. You're going to pay $20 to $30 the have a tire mounted and balanced. The faster your tires wear out, the more you're going to pay that fee. As for doing it yourself, you'll need a bead breaker, tire irons, rim protectors, and a way to balance the tire. Oh! You'll need an air compressor too!

I've gone through a lot of Dunlop GT501 tires on my Specials. I'm comfortable on them and they stick real well for my riding style. I run them a little on the low side (pressure) and they wear out even faster. I like the way they feel. The last tires I put on my XS1100SG were Metzeler ME880. I run the pressure higher and I expect a lot more miles out of them. The compound is harder, so I'm sure they won't stick the same, but so far, they stick more than well enough for me. The handling is good as well. I ran Conti Tours with good results, but they didn't last a long time either. The were economical at the purchase point. They Metzeler my have cost a bit more up front, but in the long haul it may work out to be cheaper. Time will tell.

I concur with the others on Jake Wilson/Rocky Mtn ATV. Their tire prices can't be beat and they've never charged me to ship them. To top it off, they're fast.
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Old 03-11-2012, 09:51 AM
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trbig trbig is offline
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Quote:
fwiw, u dont need to ballance the rear tyre.

There's all kinds of problems caused by an unbalanced tire, including cupping, eneven wear, build up of heat and reduced tire life, etc. Just because you don't necessarlly FEEL an unbalanced rear tire like you do the front, doesn't mean you shouldn't. If the only reason for balncing a tire was to reduce the vibration felt, then no, you wouldn't need to balance the rear. Unfortunately, that's not the only reason for doing so.


I have bought my tires from motorcycle superstore for a long time, but I will shop around the net a while first. They'll match anyone else's prices, and I usually have the tires here within 3 days.
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Last edited by trbig; 03-11-2012 at 09:54 AM.
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  #11  
Old 03-11-2012, 12:02 PM
crazy steve crazy steve is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KA1J View Post
...I just don't know enough about the different brands & models to pick from. I won't be racing the bike and with the XJ11 getting low-mid 30's for MPG, I'm aware my Buick Century gets 32MPG on the interstate... With that I'd like to hopefully get better MPG with a different tire than it has on it now. Both tires need to be replaced as they are surely past the replacement date as I discovered when I bought it, nothing seems to have been replaced for many years prior. Steve mentioned Shinko tires, I don't know a thing about them but now I will read up on them. Rather than waste money on a gamble from a convincing ad, I'd rather go along with what's considered a good tire & deal from others that already have figured out what is a great choice & pick from that group. So hearing about models and brands you're happy with will help me choose...
Everybody has their favorite, and how/where you ride will effect tire mileage. My personal observation is that spending more for a so-called 'quality name brand' doesn't always get you a better value. If a tire cost 2-3 times more than a 'budget' tire, that doesn't neccesarily mean it lasts 2-3 times as long. I was personally very partial to ChengShin 'Barracudas' until they pulled out of the motorcyle tire market, with these giving me about 5K on the rear tire vs the 8K I'd get out of tires that cost twice as much or more; so for me, they had a much better 'miles-to-dollars' ratio.

I mentioned Shinko because it seems to be a good 'budget' tire for the price, with several members expressing satisfaction with them; that's what I put on the SG I sold. I can't testify as to how long they last, but the handling seemed fine. Bridgestone 'Spitfires' is another popular choice with a lower price and decent feedback. I'm not a fan of Dunlops as they've never delivered the handling/mileage promised by the price IMO, but others have been quite happy with them. By and large, nearly any tire will give at least decent performance on dry pavement, but if you ride in the wet very often there can be big differences, so factor that into your choice.

If any part of bike ownership deserves the term 'Your mileage may vary', it's tires....
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Fast, Cheap, Reliable... Pick any two

'78E original owner - resto project
'78E ???? owner - Modder project FJ forks, 4-piston calipers F/R, 160/80-16 rear tire
'82 XJ rebuild project
'80SG restified, red SOLD
'79F parts...
'81H more parts...

Other current bikes:
'93 XL1200 Anniversary Sportster 85RWHP
'86 XL883/1200 Chopper
'82 XL1000 w/1450cc Buell, Baker 6-speed, in-progress project
Cage: '13 Mustang GT/CS with a few 'custom' touches
Yep, can't leave nuthin' alone...
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